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“If you observe a really happy man you will find him building a boat, writing a symphony, educating his son, or looking for dinosaur eggs in the Gobi Desert.” - Australian psychiatrist W. Béran Wolfe

Greetings & Thanks for Visiting!

mike corso - seo - cool site I'm a web viking and digital marketing ninja (SEO, SEM, email, social media, landing page optimization, lead generation, etc. ) responsible for Cool Site of the Day, the Internet's oldest directory (launched in 1994).  I'm also Google Adwords Qualified and am one of only .5% with direct access to Google corporate. One of my goals with Cool Site of the Day is to shine a light on all the cool websites since the beginning of cyber time.

Cool Site of the Day has featured a unique site every day since August of 1994...nearly 9,000 sites!

As for my approach to Internet marketing and SEM, the following quote says it all:

“That which is measured improves. That which is measured and reported improves exponentially.” (Pearson's Law found on Mark Joyner's Simpleology)

More background

In 1993, I was the first person to promote music on the Internet for the major record labels (via bulletin boards and primitive websites!). After 5 years working for the music industry, I bought Cool Site of the Day (1998).
I have been quoted in several online and offline publications including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal and am usually available for interviews and speaking engagements.

Sometimes I find time to offer consulting services...

If you do decide to contact me for a consultation, know that we will FOCUS on keyword research and competitor analysis INTENSELY (believe me, it will save you hours/days/months/years of heartbreak). THEN, you will know if your idea has a shot; if not, I will likely redirect you towards a more lucrative path.

How I spend my free time

Other than my business life, I'm also: Hoping our paths cross one way or another, Mike Corso e-mail: mike AT mikecorso.net facebook twitter | linkedin
"Mike Corso is incredible. Our heads hurt from the number of good ideas to track down after consulting with him for 30 minutes. Thanks, Mike!" -Jake, piclits.com
“Thanks for your insight and site evaluation. We have moved from PR3 to PR5 on one of our main landing pages thanks to you. We are on our way up thanks to your professional evaluation and valuable input. We have not implemented all of your suggestions as we have a small staff here. Thanks Again!"  Bruce Richards
“Mike Corso will show you the proper way of doing things. There is no hidden agenda, just pure information and action. You must be sleeping at the wheel if you do not get on board with Mike and his 'Crazy Train'!!” -David A.
"Keep up the good work. You really have a winner of a site, and what a way to help new sites generate the traffic they need when they first launch."  -- John H.
1-914-907-9733 mike@coolsite.com Click here for today's site

How Work Retreats Can Drive Content Strategy

How Work Retreats Can Drive Content StrategyContent development is at the heart of business promotion and conversion, but it’s easy to hit a rut when you’re churning out ideas day after day. What can you do to increase creativity and push your team towards new ways of thinking? Your best option may be to get out of the office and go on a work retreat.

Of course, not just any retreat will do – a ropes course isn’t going to help you develop content ideas – but there are high-value ways to get out from behind your desk. These 5 tips can help you make the most of your out of office experience.

Plan Properly

One of the main reasons that work retreats flop is because companies simply call up a site and book a pre-designed package, rather than developing something that meets their specific needs. For a great retreat, an internal team member should be in charge of the planning. They’ll not only handle all the travel arrangements, but also develop activities that address your brand identity and project needs from an internal perspective.

Share Your Purpose Early

Your team knows they’re going on a retreat, but do they know why? Do they know what the plan is? Instead of springing the retreat’s orientation on staff when they arrive, define and share the purpose early.

When staff members know what to expect from the retreat, they’re more likely to arrive with new ideas to discuss. Even if they only process the topic subconsciously, you may be surprised how that early orientation to the retreat program makes the whole experience more productive.

Make Fun Productive

Work retreats often fall on one of two ends of the spectrum – they’re all play because they’re focused on “team building” or they’re just an excuse to do work trainings somewhere else. The best retreats, though, fall somewhere in the middle; they’re an opportunity to brainstorm new ideas, bond as a group, and learn new things.

Hands In 4 Youth, a conference and retreat center, suggests engaging in team building activities – for example, happy hours or corporate retreats. They share that when your team feels connected, they’re able to better work together to solve problems and come up with fresh ideas.

Learn Something New

You need to develop new content, so why not spend some time learning a new skill or system that could inspire your work? For example, what if you used some of the retreat time teaching staff to use HARO, a journalistic tool that stands for “Help A Reporter Out.” Staff can practice searching the 350,000 registered journalists, learn about niche beats, and find sources for unusual topics that may inspire their own content writing.

Pave A New Way

When writing marketing content, you always match your content to a channel – but are you overlooking paths you could cover? Use your retreat to physically chart your channels, envisioning them as roads or paths that you take to your customers, and then figuring out where those might merge or form a new junction. When you visualize your content in this way, you see the many possibilities that are still out there.

It doesn’t matter where your retreat takes you, as long as the final stop is success. Instead of being destination focused, keep your eye on the company’s endgame and think creativity. Let the work be play and the ideas flow. When you arrive back in the office, your team will be producing at a whole new level.

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